This Surge Knight Was At “The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation”


After more than 20 years, I’ve finally decided to tell the world what I witnessed in 1991, which I believe was one of the biggest turning point in popular music, and ultimately American society. I have struggled for a long time weighing the pros and cons of making this story public as I was reluctant to implicate the individuals who were present that day. So I’ve simply decided to leave out names and all the details that may risk my personal well being and that of those who were, like me, dragged into something they weren’t ready for.

Between the late 80’s and early 90’s, I was what you may call a “decision maker” with one of the more established company in the music industry. I came from Europe in the early 80’s and quickly established myself in the business. The industry was different back then. Since technology and media weren’t accessible to people like they are today, the industry had more control over the public and had the means to influence them anyway it wanted. This may explain why in early 1991, I was invited to attend a closed door meeting with a small group of music business insiders to discuss rap music’s new direction. Little did I know that we would be asked to participate in one of the most unethical and destructive business practice I’ve ever seen.

http://www.normschriever.com/blog/dont-believe-the-hype-a-counterpoint-to-the-secret-meeting-that-changed-rap-story

This could finally be the end of the road for the record-label head who, a generation ago, helped bring the West Coast gangsta rap of Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg and Tupac Shakur to the mainstream, pushing aside the pop rap of artists such as MC Hammer and Tone-Loc and putting low-riders and gang signs into heavy rotation on MTV. In the process, Knight established himself as a legendary music-biz tough guy. His exploits — some mythic, some real — during the heyday of Death Row Records have become part of hip-hop lore: In the early Nineties, he allegedly shook down Vanilla Ice into handing over publishing profits, walking the rapper out to a hotel-room balcony to show him how far his fall would be. (“I needed to wear a diaper that day,” Ice said later.) In his memoir, former N.W.A manager Jerry Heller alleged that Knight and his cohorts, bearing baseball bats, intimidated Eazy-E into releasing Dre from his Ruthless Records contract. (The claims have never been substantiated.) Knight was sitting next to Tupac when he was gunned down in 1996 in Las Vegas; his participation in a fight on the night of the shooting would land him in prison for five years on a probation violation.

 

http://www.hiphopisread.com/2012/04/secret-meeting-that-changed-rap-music.html

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Analysis of Remarks by SAC Greg Bretzing at a Press Conference to Address the Ongoing Situation at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge


With little fanfare, this is a raw analysis of the press conference that went with the release of Remarks by SAC Greg Bretzing at a Press Conference to Address the Ongoing Situation at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge written statement present by FBI Portland
January 28, 2016

I will make it as easy to digest as possible within time constraints. This is not a polish piece. This is intended only to document in the most immediate fashion. If it warrants being polished this will be the draft it comes from. To use this analysis, please contact me. All rights reserved. This is the intellectual property of the Julia Clark Organization.

The source of the analysis is from shuff1111 of youtube. I do not know him. He only by chance was one of the first to have the Video of the press conference up. What I do find odd is that the press conference was not recorded and posted by any known agency or corporate media. Thank you shuff1111 for your service.

 

This is the Analysis derived: 

I have highlighted or noted points. This is not intended for laymen explanation. Please ask if you need more explanation or are curious about a highlight or note. 

1:10 trips over the word transparency

1:37 trips over the word several

3:42 video stream fails

3:42 says “Shortly the camera will pan back to” the video feed does not pan when it returns.

3:53 the video feed returns.

3:53 He says, “Oh, heads up.”

4:06 He says, “The camera is panning back to the jeep at this point.”

12:52 He states Oregon State Troupers were the ones that fired the weapons.

13:43 He uses “Umm” and tightened lips and sucked them inward

13:44 Shakes his head in a no fashion

13:47 He says, “That law enforcement showed great restraint while holding his hand in front of him in a barrier type way

13:50 He says “Then when the vehicle, then took off.” his voice quivers

13:51 Uses ‘Ummm”

13:52 He says, “you could see that it just about seriously injured, ahh, a law enforcement officer.”

13:53 a micro head shake

13:58 he says, “as its, as it barrels toward”

14:01 he says, “And that umm” pursed his lips together

14:06 He says, “based on the deadly force policy of the FBI and OSP Umm ahh that “

14:06 and extended blink

14:17 Uses “Umm” then says “as you can see afterwards and as I explained in the video, those pops and sounds that umm. Of course, there is no sounds in the video.”

14:28 He says, “flash bangs, ahh, sponge projectiles that pierce the window and oc gas

14:44 shakes head

14:44 He says “all occupants in the jeep surrendered without incident” shakes head again

14:50 He says “ahh with no violence”

15:00 smiles

15:06 Purse and smacks lips, their latest.

16:48 Serious look, looks, down and to the right, takes a deep breath uses “Umm” 3 times while explaining

18:23 He is asked if this is a stop for a traffic violation. The question clearly amuses him. He first clearly states, “no.” then says, “Not that I’m. Well, then. You know what, I don’t know, there might have been” takes a ha, “that was not the purpose of the call err the stop”

  • This is troubling. He clearly and jovially changes the case file to fit his theory. He says,”No.” firmly, then catches himself. Dismisses himself and stops that dismissal midsentence. then moves to the willing chair with the statement, “well, then”, and  makes a choice to fudge the records with the justification, “You know what” statement, then proceeds to change the record.
  • However, his utterance and mistaken word of using call instead of stop. Highly suggests that  that the call the Bundy’s had hours before from the FBI negotiator was also a fabrication and not in good faith.

 

18:29 He takes a question about distance. He says that he “You know, the exact distance, I can’t tell you. That’s why we actually show you the video. You can tell that a period of time went by and that they were traveling at a high rate of speed. Umm. He purses lips and licks them. “And they had plenty of. And again they were, they were stopped for well over four minutes. And then they chose.. as I said two nights ago or last night.” smacks lips, “Actions have consequences”

19:19 stumbles over the word truck, using car instead and correcting himself.

19:23 he says, “And is currently in our custody, umm” then purse lips

19:34 he says, “But umm as the video clearly shows”

Screenshots of questionable moments.

These are points noted while watching of questionable moments.

LaVoy

This is not inclusive of all points of analysis.

JC

 

 

4 Alternate Theories on Who Hacked Sony — NYMag


While North Korea complained about The Interview to the United Nations in July, it appears the film’s connection to the Sony attack originated in the media. In an email sent to Sony executives three days before the attack, the apparent hackers wrote in broken English, “monetary compensation we want.” There was no mention of The Interview in these initial communications, and on December 1 someone claiming to be a Guardians of Peace spokesperson told CSO Online that reports citing the film as the motivation for the hack were untrue. “We are an international organization including famous figures in the politics and society from several nations such as United States, United Kingdom and France,” the hacker claimed. “We are not under direction of any state.”

via 4 Alternate Theories on Who Hacked Sony — NYMag.

Snapchat CEO ‘devastated’ by email leak in Sony hack – CNET


Snapchat CEO ‘devastated’ by email leak in Sony hack – CNET.

NY times slug from 18 hours ago says 32,000 emails from Lynton . The Hollywood Reporter, the first one to press about Lynton leaks says 12,466 emails. Out of 12,466 – 30,000 emails the only story is one about snapchat? Snapchat the one who was releaved of 98,000 photos.

Inside Sony’s Mysterious ‘Red Pockets’: Hackers Blow Open China Bribery Probe


He encouraged employees to speak out when they suspected anyone of venality.

via Inside Sony’s Mysterious ‘Red Pockets’: Hackers Blow Open China Bribery Probe.

being able to uy someone would have been useful in getting information to be able to bust him and his location.

One time when I was having  very difficult time with cowing from many redflag accounts, rotharmy put up a video that had been obtained by surveillance . It was a surveillance of him I had no doubt. After that the cowing against me lightened up

I wonder if I can find the video I am speaking of.  Nope could not find it. If I happen upon it in any of my blogs, I’ll put it over here, if I remember to.

Sony Pictures Knew of Gaps in Computer Network Before Hack Attack | Re/code


Auditors found that since transitioning from a third-party vendor in September 2013, Sony Pictures had failed to notify the corporate security team to monitor newly added devices, such as web servers and routers.

Studio management told the auditors its corporate security team is focused on bolstering devices on the perimeter of Sony’s networks and that it hasn’t applied “the same level of rigor” for other, non-security devices such as routers and web servers. The document doesn’t go into detail as to why a different standard was applied.

By the end of July, Sony Pictures provided a current inventory of all devices to be tracked.

Auditors also found that Sony Pictures failed to reconcile the list of security devices its corporate team should have been monitoring with those it was monitoring. As a result, they might have missed additional devices being added to or removed from the networking, adding that “critical security devices may not be monitored.”

Sony Pictures’ in-house staff pledged to develop a process for keeping track of its devices by Oct. 31 — barely a month before hackers made their presence on the studio’s corporate network known.

via Sony Pictures Knew of Gaps in Computer Network Before Hack Attack | Re/code.

 

This was his backdoors and gifting backdoors , to have secure bouncers when talking and revealing details, such as when gaga entered a plastic bubble on live television . by useing this means he could bounce around various sony companies and have solid heads up if any harassment, blackmail, etc cases   would come up.

Boston gang-unit officer charged with lying to FBI – Metro – The Boston Globe


A former Boston police officer assigned to a Youth Violence Strike Force was charged in federal court Thursday with making false statements to an FBI agent investigating a violent street gang in Roxbury.

Mel Steele, 36, faces one count of lying to the FBI during the course of a federal investigation.

Steele recently resigned from the department.

Boston Police Department spokesman David Estrada said the charges stem from an internal investigation that was conducted by the Boston Police anticorruption unit along with the FBI.

He said Steele resigned effective Oct. 17, but he would not comment further.

Steele’s attorney, Rudolph Miller, could not be reached for comment late Thursday.

According to court records, Steele was charged in relation to an investigation into a violent drug-dealing gang based at the Academy Homes housing development in Roxbury.

Authorities said that Steele, who was assigned to the Youth Violence Strike Force, the Police Department’s gang unit, was a longtime friend of an associate of the Roxbury gang.

Steele is accused of providing internal police information to the associate while Boston police and the FBI were investigating the gang from 2009 to 2011.

On one occasion, authorities said, Steele used his Boston police computer to run a license plate check on a vehicle. The vehicle turned out to be an unmarked Boston police car driven by a detective conducting surveillance on the gang.

Steele also allegedly contacted a State Police trooper to seek information about a gang member’s pending charges in another criminal case.

Steele is accused of making false statements when FBI agents confronted him in May 2011. He faces up to five years in prison and three years of supervised release, though if he is convicted, he is likely to be sentenced to less than the maximum.

Steele, raised in Mattapan, started at the police academy in 2002, according to Estrada, but it was unknown Thursday how long he had been a member of the gang unit, where he was considered a rising star. His work to quell street violence was featured in the Boston Herald in 2008.

Former supervisors said that they had been impressed by Steele’s ability to connect with young people on the street, according to one Boston police official who knows Steele and considers him a friend. The official said Thursday that Steele could talk to young men about music, school, and where their life was headed.

“He had a great reputation,” said the official, who was not authorized to speak publicly.

“He grew up on the streets. He could relate to these kids. I can’t believe he got caught up in that. He was a really good police officer.”

Evan Allen and Maria Cramer of the Globe Staff contributed to this report. Milton J. Valencia can be reached at mvalencia

@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @miltonvalencia.

via Boston gang-unit officer charged with lying to FBI – Metro – The Boston Globe.

Reply to the JCO from Nancy McNamara – Assistant Director ; Federal Bureau of Investigation – Inspection Division concerning the Boston Bombing Research Data Submitted by the JCO


SAMSUNG

This is a follow-up post to
From the Desk of Julia Clark & Research Notes JCO

And

Research Data Conveyed to DoJ and FBI Inspections Division – Boston bombing and peripheral events

Yahoo! blocks! Google! and ! Facebook! from! grabbing! ID! goodies! • The Register


Yahoo! blocks! Google! and ! Facebook! from! grabbing! ID! goodies! • The Register.

This is noted because three of the IDs that were connected to the exploitive use of SONYs data bases were known sport fanatics and made extensive use  of Yahoo!’s fantasy football tourneys across many forums to develop, nurture, and groom relationships. It is unknown if these forums enacted different security measures after the snowden revelations.  It is unknown the extent Yahoo! has addressed, secured, and changed security policy, if at all, concerning its user data and access to sub-networks and infrastructure networks. The exploits have not been probed in over a year and not released into the general knowledge base (wild) for other researchers.

JEREMY’ HAMMOND SENTENCING STATEMENT | 11/15/2013


JEREMY’ HAMMOND SENTENCING STATEMENT | 11/15/2013

Good morning. Thank you for this opportunity. My name is Jeremy Hammond and I’m here to be sentenced for hacking activities carried out during my involvement with Anonymous. I have been locked up at MCC for the past 20 months and have had a lot of time to think about how I would explain my actions.

Before I begin, I want to take a moment to recognize the work of the people who have supported me. I want to thank all the lawyers and others who worked on my case: Elizabeth Fink, Susan Kellman, Sarah Kunstler, Emily Kunstler, Margaret Kunstler, and Grainne O’Neill. I also want to thank the National Lawyers Guild, the Jeremy Hammond Defense Committee and Support Network, Free Anons, the Anonymous Solidarity Network, Anarchist Black Cross, and all others who have helped me by writing a letter of support, sending me letters, attending my court dates, and spreading the word about my case. I also want to shout out my brothers and sisters behind bars and those who are still out there fighting the power.

The acts of civil disobedience and direct action that I am being sentenced for today are in line with the principles of community and equality that have guided my life. I hacked into dozens of high profile corporations and government institutions, understanding very clearly that what I was doing was against the law, and that my actions could land me back in federal prison. But I felt that I had an obligation to use my skills to expose and confront injustice—and to bring the truth to light.

Could I have achieved the same goals through legal means? I have tried everything from voting petitions to peaceful protest and have found that those in power do not want the truth to be exposed. When we speak truth to power we are ignored at best and brutally suppressed at worst. We are confronting a power structure that does not respect its own system of checks and balances, never mind the rights of it’s own citizens or the international community.

My introduction to politics was when George W. Bush stole the Presidential election in 2000, then took advantage of the waves of racism and patriotism after 9/11 to launch unprovoked imperialist wars against Iraq and Afghanistan. I took to the streets in protest naively believing our voices would be heard in Washington and we could stop the war. Instead, we were labeled as traitors, beaten, and arrested.

I have been arrested for numerous acts of civil disobedience on the streets of Chicago, but it wasn’t until 2005 that I used my computer skills to break the law in political protest. I was arrested by the FBI for hacking into the computer systems of a right-wing, pro-war group called Protest Warrior, an organization that sold racist t-shirts on their website and harassed anti-war groups. I was charged under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, and the “intended loss” in my case was arbitrarily calculated by multiplying the 5000 credit cards in Protest Warrior’s database by $500, resulting in a total of $2.5 million.My sentencing guidelines were calculated on the basis of this “loss,” even though not a single credit card was used or distributed – by me or anyone else. I was sentenced to two years in prison.

While in prison I have seen for myself the ugly reality of how the criminal justice system destroys the lives of the millions of people held captive behind bars. The experience solidified my opposition to repressive forms of power and the importance of standing up for what you believe.

When I was released, I was eager to continue my involvement in struggles for social change. I didn’t want to go back to prison, so I focused on above-ground community organizing. But over time, I became frustrated with the limitations, of peaceful protest, seeing it as reformist and ineffective. The Obama administration continued the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, escalated the use of drones, and failed to close Guantanamo Bay.

Around this time, I was following the work of groups like Wikileaks and Anonymous. It was very inspiring to see the ideas of hactivism coming to fruition. I was particularly moved by the heroic actions of Chelsea Manning, who had exposed the atrocities committed by U.S. forces in Iraq and Afghanistan. She took an enormous personal risk to leak this information – believing that the public had a right to know and hoping that her disclosures would be a positive step to end these abuses. It is heart-wrenching to hear about her cruel treatment in military lockup.

I thought long and hard about choosing this path again. I had to ask myself, if Chelsea Manning fell into the abysmal nightmare of prison fighting for the truth, could I in good conscience do any less, if I was able? I thought the best way to demonstrate solidarity was to continue the work of exposing and confronting corruption.

I was drawn to Anonymous because I believe in autonomous, decentralized direct action. At the time Anonymous was involved in operations in support of the Arab Spring uprisings, against censorship, and in defense of Wikileaks. I had a lot to contribute, including technical skills, and how to better articulate ideas and goals. It was an exciting time – the birth of a digital dissent movement, where the definitions and capabilities of hacktivism were being shaped.

I was especially interested in the work of the hackers of LulzSec who were breaking into some significant targets and becoming increasingly political. Around this time, I first started talking to Sabu, who was very open about the hacks he supposedly committed, and was encouraging hackers to unite and attack major government and corporate systems under the banner of Anti Security. But very early in my involvement, the other Lulzsec hackers were arrested, leaving me to break into systems and write press releases. Later, I would learn that Sabu had been the first one arrested, and that the entire time I was talking to him he was an FBI informant.

Anonymous was also involved in the early stages of Occupy Wall Street. I was regularly participating on the streets as part of Occupy Chicago and was very excited to see a worldwide mass movement against the injustices of capitalism and racism. In several short months, the “Occupations” came to an end, closed by police crackdowns and mass arrests of protestors who were kicked out of their own public parks. The repression of Anonymous and the Occupy Movement set the tone for Antisec in the following months – the majority of our hacks against police targets were in retaliation for the arrests of our comrades.

I targeted law enforcement systems because of the racism and inequality with which the criminal law is enforced. I targeted the manufacturers and distributors of military and police equipment who profit from weaponry used to advance U.S. political and economic interests abroad and to repress people at home. I targeted information security firms because they work in secret to protect government and corporate interests at the expense of individual rights, undermining and discrediting activists, journalists and other truth seekers, and spreading disinformation.

I had never even heard of Stratfor until Sabu brought it to my attention. Sabu was encouraging people to invade systems, and helping to strategize and facilitate attacks. He even provided me with vulnerabilities of targets passed on by other hackers, so it came as a great surprise when I learned that Sabu had been working with the FBI the entire time.

On December 4, 2011, Sabu was approached by another hacker who had already broken into Stratfor’s credit card database. Sabu, under the watchful eye of his government handlers, then brought the hack to Antisec by inviting this hacker to our private chatroom, where he supplied download links to the full credit card database as well as the initial vulnerability access point to Stratfor’s systems.

I spent some time researching Stratfor and reviewing the information we were given, and decided that their activities and client base made them a deserving target. I did find it ironic that Stratfor’s wealthy and powerful customer base had their credit cards used to donate to humanitarian organizations, but my main role in the attack was to retrieve Stratfor’s private email spools which is where all the dirty secrets are typically found.

It took me more than a week to gain further access into Stratfor’s internal systems, but I eventually broke into their mail server. There was so much information, we needed several servers of our own in order to transfer the emails. Sabu, who was involved with the operation at every step, offered a server, which was provided and monitored by the FBI. Over the next weeks, the emails were transferred, the credit cards were used for donations, and Stratfor’s systems were defaced and destroyed. Why the FBI would introduce us to the hacker who found the initial vulnerability and allow this hack to continue remains a mystery.

As a result of the Stratfor hack, some of the dangers of the unregulated private intelligence industry are now known. It has been revealed through Wikileaks and other journalists around the world that Stratfor maintained a worldwide network of informants that they used to engage in intrusive and possibly illegal surveillance activities on behalf of large multinational corporations.

After Stratfor, I continued to break into other targets, using a powerful “zero day exploit” allowing me administrator access to systems running the popular Plesk webhosting platform. Sabu asked me many times for access to this exploit, which I refused to give him. Without his own independent access, Sabu continued to supply me with lists of vulnerable targets. I broke into numerous websites he supplied, uploaded the stolen email accounts and databases onto Sabu’s FBI server, and handed over passwords and backdoors that enabled Sabu (and, by extension, his FBI handlers) to control these targets.

These intrusions, all of which were suggested by Sabu while cooperating with the FBI, affected thousands of domain names and consisted largely of foreign government websites, including those of XXXXXXX, XXXXXXXX, XXXX, XXXXXX, XXXXX, XXXXXXXX, XXXXXXX and theXXXXXX XXXXXXX. In one instance, Sabu and I provided access information to hackers who went on to deface and destroy many government websites in XXXXXX. I don’t know how other information I provided to him may have been used, but I think the government’s collection and use of this data needs to be investigated.

jeremy hammond hearing
Sketch from inside Judge Preska’s courtroom by Molly Crabapple

The government celebrates my conviction and imprisonment, hoping that it will close the door on the full story. I took responsibility for my actions, by pleading guilty, but when will the government be made to answer for its crimes?

The U.S. hypes the threat of hackers in order to justify the multi billion dollar cyber security industrial complex, but it is also responsible for the same conduct it aggressively prosecutes and claims to work to prevent. The hypocrisy of “law and order” and the injustices caused by capitalism cannot be cured by institutional reform but through civil disobedience and direct action. Yes I broke the law, but I believe that sometimes laws must be broken in order to make room for change.

In the immortal word of Frederick Douglas, “Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. Find out just what any people will quietly submit to and you have found out the exact measure of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them, and these will continue till they are resisted with either words or blows, or both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress.”

This is not to say that I do not have any regrets. I realize that I released the personal information of innocent people who had nothing to do with the operations of the institutions I targeted. I apologize for the release of data that was harmful to individuals and irrelevant to my goals. I believe in the individual right to privacy – from government surveillance, and from actors like myself, and I appreciate the irony of my own involvement in the trampling of these rights. I am committed to working to make this world a better place for all of us. I still believe in the importance of hactivism as a form of civil disobedience, but it is time for me to move on to other ways of seeking change. My time in prison has taken a toll on my family, friends, and community. I know I am needed at home. I recognize that 7 years ago I stood before a different federal judge, facing similar charges, but this does not lessen the sincerity of what I say to you today.

It has taken a lot for me to write this, to explain my actions, knowing that doing so — honestly — could cost me more years of my life in prison. I am aware that I could get as many as 10 years, but I hope that I do not, as I believe there is so much work to be done

VIA http://www.sparrowmedia.net/2013/11/jeremy-hammond-sentence/